No AccessAmerican Journal of AudiologyResearch Articles1 Jun 2001

Survey of Hearing Aid Fitting Practices for Children with Multiple Impairments

    The fitting of amplification on young children with multiple impairments in addition to hearing loss is a challenge faced regularly by audiologists. However, very little has been published on this topic in the audiological literature. The purpose of this survey was to document hearing aid fitting practices for this population within the United States. Specifically, audiologists who regularly serve children were asked to complete a series of questions on their educational preparation and their hearing aid selection, fitting, and verification practices for children with multiple impairments. For purposes of this survey, multiple impairments included vision impairment, mental retardation, physical impairment, and autism spectrum disorders. Findings from this survey suggest that children with special needs in addition to hearing loss are typically fit in the same way and with the same type of amplification as those with hearing loss only. In addition, differences were noted in hearing aid selection, fitting, and verification practices across work settings. Future directions and research needs are suggested.

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