No AccessEditor's AwardJournal of Speech, Language, and Hearing ResearchResearch Article15 Feb 2018

Well-Being and Resilience in Children With Speech and Language Disorders

    Purpose

    Children with speech and language disorders are at risk in relation to psychological and social well-being. The aim of this study was to understand the experiences of these children from their own perspectives focusing on risks to their well-being and protective indicators that may promote resilience.

    Method

    Eleven 9- to 12-year-old children (4 boys and 7 girls) were recruited using purposeful sampling. One participant presented with a speech sound disorder, 1 presented with both a speech and language disorder, and 9 with language disorders. All were receiving additional educational supports. Narrative inquiry, a qualitative design, was employed. Data were generated in home and school settings using multiple semi-structured interviews with each child over a 6-month period. A total of 59 interviews were conducted. The data were analyzed to identify themes in relation to potential risk factors to well-being and protective strategies.

    Results

    Potential risk factors in relation to well-being were communication impairment and disability, difficulties with relationships, and concern about academic achievement. Potential protective strategies were hope, agency, and positive relationships.

    Conclusion

    This study highlights the importance of listening to children's narratives so that those at risk in relation to well-being can be identified. Conceptualization of well-being and resilience within an ecological framework may enable identification of protective strategies at both individual and environmental levels that can be strengthened to mitigate negative experiences.

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