Speech-language pathologists play a crucial role in helping adolescents with language disorders improve their ability to comprehend and produce the language of the curriculum (i.e., expository discourse) and, thus, enhance their potential for academic success. The purpose of this article is to present numerous treatment techniques and strategies for increasing both spoken and written expository discourse skills in this population.

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